The global corona virius death toll has crossed one million and the USs accounts for more than 20%.

In less than 8 months from the first reported coronavirus-related death in Wuhan, China, on January 9 to a global death toll of 1,001,800 on early Tuesday morning, Sept 29, according to data from Johns Hopkins University, the US has been affected hard, with more than 7.1 million reported infections and 205,085 deaths.

And with recent rise in cases, health experts warn things could soon get worse in the US.

Only 20 states are holding steady when it comes to the average of daily new cases compared to last week, while 23 are reporting more: Alabama, Alaska, Colorado, Idaho, Indiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Oregon, South Carolina, South Dakota, Utah, Vermont, Washington, Wisconsin and Wyoming.

Seven states show less new cases — Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, Rhode Island, Texas and Virginia.

With fall and winter soon driving people indoors and bringing flu season with it, experts say Americans will need to be consistent with following recommended guidelines.

Mask wearing, social distancing and avoiding large crowds will be key, experts say, along with authorities increasing testing as infections rises up again.

The US currently ranks highest on the total number of reported coronavirus deaths worldwide and sixth per 100,000 people.

Johns Hopkins’ tally shows the US, Brazil, India and Mexico account for more than 50% of the deaths worldwide.

Photo:

Activists from the COVID Memorial Project mark the deaths of 200,000 lives lost in the U.S. to COVID-19. They placed small American flags on the grounds of the National Mall in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)